Tuesday, March 21, 2017

Mangrove Meet-up: Sharing ideas, perspectives and experiences

By MAP Volunteer Intern, Emma McDowell

March 9th was another sweltering day in southern Thailand.  The air was almost wet with humidity, the sun beat down from overhead, and the relentless heat hung around like a blanket.  However, the midday temperature did not stop the seven villagers from Ban Thung Yor, Klong Thom, Krabi Province who were exploring the mangrove restoration site at Ban Nai Nang.  This was the second stop on a two-day tour of three villages affiliated with Mangrove Action Project (MAP) and funded through Synchronicity Earth of the UK.  The tour was set up to highlight the experiences of MAPs participants and share ideas of how to successfully restore their own mangrove area.
Our group posing for a picture in front of the bee and
 rubber garden at Ban Nai Nang.  March 8th, 2017.
Earlier that day they had explored the site at Ban Lang Da- a reclaimed shrimp pond area where the abundant green mangroves showed the success of the Community Based Ecological Mangrove Restoration project (CBEMR) started in 2008.  The site was restored back to mangrove forest, after it had been converted into a shrimp pond and then abandoned for more than 10 years.  Village leader Mr. Bandon Mad-osot showed the sites’ foliage and reestablished fish, crab and bird populations to the villagers from Ban Thung Yor.   He spoke of his community’s experience working with MAP and ended his tour by saying, “I don’t have very much more to say.  Just do it!  You will see so many benefits for your community.”  The villagers asked many questions and were excited to see how the area has reestablished the mangroves over time.  “It is beautiful,” spoke the village chief of Thung Yor, “so much green everywhere.”

The second stop of the day brought the villagers to the heat of mid-day and to the eco village of Ban Nai Nang.  Villagers got to meet Mr. Sutee Pankwan ­­­­­­­the chairperson of the villages apiculture group, and discussed how the village has many different groups (crab bank, ecotourism, and apiculture product production) and that all work together and contribute their profits to the conservation group that aids the preservation of the mangroves.  Sutee Pankwan highlighted the need to learn and work together and share knowledge to be successful, and told the group that, “working together is the key to our success.  We all have different groups in the village, but we always make sure that some of the money we make, goes into the conservation fund.  Without nature, our projects would be pointless.”  He also shared that the village was trying to register as a community forest, and that they have plans to work on rehabilitating the mangrove area in the coming month.  After trying some of the delicious honey and touring the mangrove site, the villagers embarked on the final step of their trip.     
Participants show off their beautiful handmade Batik
prints at Ban Talae Nok, March 9th , 2017
The tour concluded with an overnight visit to the village of Ban Talae Nok.  Villagers here have worked for years to reestablish their mangrove area, and have divided it into two sections- one left to restore naturally, and another with the addition of the planning of Nypa plants that the villagers use for thatch roofs, cigarette rollers, food, and daily life.  Villagers of Ban Thung Yor were invited to learn to make batik fabric prints and were taken on a tour of the mangrove area, which has grown a considerable amount since the last time it was visited.  “Our biggest problem was hydrology of the site,” spoke Mr. Ekakarat Cheangyang, “once we got the hydrology fixed, the area grew back quite quickly, and is still growing.”  Indeed, the lush green leaves and myriad of crabs, birds, and monkeys are a sure sign of the sites success.
A group “selfie” in the Mangrove Restoration Site
 at Ban Talae Nok. March 9th, 2017.



Upon saying goodbye, and arriving back in Ban Thung Yor, the participants were left with a lot of information and knowledge.  Thung Yor village chief, Mr. Raksa Komodkhan  said, “Thank you so much for taking us on this trip.  We have a lot to think about now and will raise these ideas with our community.”  Hopefully after some reflection, they will decide to join the MAP network and make their site the latest addition to the restoration areas directed by MAP.

For more images from the study tour, please look on the Mangrove Action Project Facebook

Thursday, March 16, 2017

MAP News Issue 412, March 18, 2017

Mangrove Action Project News

The MAP News
412th Edition                               March 18, 2017

FEATURE STORY
 
Ecological Mangrove Rehabilitation in Indonesia demonstrates effectiveness
Tiwoho
In 1991, 20 hectares of pristine and biodiverse mangroves were cleared in Tiwoho Village, part of Bunaken National Marine Park, as part of a nation-wide program of aquaculture development known as the Blue Revolution, which has resulted in the loss of over 1,000,000 hectares of mangroves nation-wide. The aquaculture venture operated only for a period of 6 months, and the land lay fallow for the next decade. Six attempts to plant mangroves took place over the intervening years, but none of these attempts succeeded, as a result of failure to restore a functional hydrology to the system, which is the limiting factor for successful mangrove rehabilitation. In 2004, the principles of Ecological Mangrove Rehabilitation were applied to the site in a collaboration between villagers, local universities and NGOs, and international ecologists. The following pages bring to life this pivotal rehabilitation effort, the first of its kind in Indonesia where communities were enjoined to repair the hydrology of an abandoned shrimp pond complex to promote natural regeneration of mangroves. This pilot project has led to the successful rehabilitation of over 2000 hectares of mangroves in other parts of Indonesia, and serves as an example of collaboration and adaptive management that is changing the way Indonesian practitioners address mangrove restoration.
VIEW STORY ONLINE -or- DOWNLOAD PDF HERE


AFRICA

Kenyan community project restores mangroves while selling carbon credits
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KENYA - Two villages living adjacent to the Indian Ocean in the southern coast of Kenya are improving their livelihoods after earning money from selling carbon credit from mangrove trees to international environmental organizations. Diana Wanyonyi reports from Mombasa. In the swampy, soft mud of the mangrove forest on Kenya’s south coast, farmer Idi BomaniI is with a local community group surveying and planting some of the seedlings that have fallen from the trees in the estuary. Idi is a member of the Mikoko Pamoja community project, a conservation and restoration program in which locals farm mangrove trees on the shores of the Indian Ocean. Mikoko Pamoja is the Swahili word for “mangrove.” The group was founded in 2009 after the residents of two nearby villages – Gazi and Makongeni – realized that the number of mangroves, which they depend on daily, were rapidly disappearing due to illegal harvesting for firewood, burning charcoal and building materials. READ MORE

Mangroves give services worth millions of dirhams
UAE - Millions of dollars’ worth environmental services provided by mangroves to the UAE people once again highlights the fact that their value goes beyond aesthetic beauty, a study presented on Tuesday said. A hectare mangrove offers ecosystem services valued at $193,845 (Dh71,1973) a year without including carbon sequestration services, according to the study. Mangroves offer a natural carbon sequestration process, by which carbon dioxide is removed from the atmosphere, mitigating the global warming. Coastal ecosystems such as mangroves that store and sequestrate carbon are called blue carbon ecosystems. Corals, seagrass beds, salt marshes, costal sand dunes and oyster beds are the other components of this ecosystem. The combined value of Abu Dhabi’s blue carbon ecosystems’ services was estimated to exceed Dh 2 billion a year. These services include carbon sequestration and storage, coastline protection, habitat provision and water purification. READ MORE

ASIA

Reclamation ruining mangroves and livelihood
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MALAYSIA - Sahabat Alam Malaysia (SAM) has urged the Kedah Department of Environment to stop a reclamation project taking place in Kampung Tepi Laut near Kuala Kedah here. SAM president S.M. Mohamed Idris said the project had contravened environmental regulations and destroyed the area’s mangroves, adding that this would threaten the coastal fishermen’s source of income. “We are alarmed that the state government and local authority allowed the project to take place although the Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) of the project has yet to be approved. “The EIA report is now being exhibited for public review from now until March 25,” he said in a statement recently. Mohamed Idris said a survey conducted found that a distance of about 1km out to sea had been reclaimed and nearly 10ha of mangroves along the coast had been affected. “This will threaten the marine life and affect the income of some 500 local fishermen’s families who make a living in the area. READ MORE

Mangroves in Manori-Gorai being destroyed
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Thousands of mangrove trees along the Manori-Gorai belt have been destroyed through debris dumping, according to environment groups. In a letter to the mangrove cell, suburban collector and local ward officer, NGO Plants and Animals Welfare Society (PAWS-Mumbai) identified two locations with ongoing construction work within mangrove forests, a violation of environment laws and Bombay High Court (HC) rules. “Close to 2,000 mangrove trees have been hacked through land filling and dumping debris along Gorai - Borivali Road, near Essel World and Global Pagoda, which not only threatens marine life but disrupts the ecosystem, flora and fauna, and also harms the buffer zone against floods,” said Sunish Subramanian Kunju, secretary, PAWS-Mumbai. Through several images and satellite maps, the NGO identified that a gate had been setup to stop people from entering the site. A kilometre further down from the gate, excavator machines were spotted dumping debris and the area was cordoned off using tin sheets and green cloth. “Unidentified people have also set up watchtowers at the site to check the movement of citizens so that they cannot identify the violations,” said Kunju, adding, “It is clear a road is being constructed through the mangrove forests and a resort might be in the offing.” READ MORE

Deforestation in Sri Lanka slowed by 0.4% over ten years
SRI LANKA - According to the report issued by the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) of the United Nations, deforestation in Sri Lanka has decreased by 0.4 per cent during the past decade. Conservator General of Forests Anura Sathurusinghe said that the FAO report, issued every five years, has rated Sri Lanka as a country with less deforestation during the period of years 2000 – 2010. Meanwhile, he said they had decided to launch an web portal to detect the places where deforestation was prevalent around the country. “The website will be launched in the coming month. Any person who has information of deforestation taking place in their areas can inform us so that we can investigate it,” he said, adding this would help immeasurably to control deforestation in the country. - READ MORE

AMERICAS

Fisherwomen from Venezuela recognized for their achievement
VenezuelaWomen
VENEZUELA - For the first time in Venezuela, seven fisher-women from Paraguaná have been recognized by the Environmental Protection Association (AEPA Falcon), a non governmental environmental organization that is governed by the United Nations. The event, called ”Meeting of Fisher Women”, is aimed at enhancing the role of women in fishing, thus breaking with the norms that artisanal fishing in Venezuela. The award recognizes that their production and efforts are no longer solely relegated to men and shows that females are now being seen within this ancestral practice and play a crucial role in society. The meeting was attended by regional authorities, including the Legislative Council member Falcón (CLEF) Daicis López, Falcón Ombudsman Edisoi Sandoval, Los Taques councilor Ronny Falcón, the chronicler of Los Taques Jesus Muñoz Freites, representatives of the Regional Comptroller, Ministry of Fisheries, Unamujer and delegates of CONPPA Tío Pedro from the community of El Supí. READ MORE

Honduras wetlands grabbing continues in Ramsar Site 1000
HONDURAS - Land (and water) grabbing and loss of biodiversity is taking place in the wetlands of Ramsar Site #1000 and the Protected Areas (PAs) of the Gulf of Fonseca, Honduras, mainly due to shrimp aquaculture. The institutions responsible for conserving these ecosystems, such as the Instituto de Conservación Forestal (ICF), the Honduran Forestry Conservation Institute, and Mi Ambiente (MiA), the country’s Energy, Natural Resources, Environment and Mining Ministry, are unable or unwilling to enforce the environmental essence of their statements and those made by the president of Honduras. There are 4 business entrepreneurs in the Gulf in Fonseca who are taking over the wetlands along a large portion of the southern coast. READ MORE

Industry lobbyists threaten marine monument designations
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USA - Elected representatives in Congress and industry groups are appealing to the administration of U.S. President Donald Trump to investigate the potential of removing marine monument designations made by Trump’s predecessors, Barack Obama and George W. Bush. U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Natural Resources Chairman Rob Bishop (R-UT) and Rep. Aumua Amata Coleman Radewagen (R-American Samoa) sent a letter to Trump earlier this week requesting the removal of fishing restrictions and the reinstatement of fisheries management under federal law, according to a letter released by the committee. “Using the Antiquities Act to close U.S. waters to domestic fisheries is a clear example of federal overreach and regulatory duplication and obstructs well-managed, sustainable U.S. fishing industries in favor of their foreign counterparts,” the letter said. In their letter, Bishop and Radewagen urge Trump to “act swiftly and effectively to remove all marine monument fishing prohibitions,” but do not clarify what specific actions they are asking Trump to take to undo the marine monument designations made under the powers of the Antiquities Act. READ MORE

Conservation groups push Mexican shrimp boycott to save vaquita
vaquita
MEXICO - Citing the need for emergency action to save the dwindling population of the endangered vaquita, the world’s smallest porpoise, representatives of several conservation-focused organizations are calling for a boycott on shrimp sourced from Mexico. Fewer than 40 individual vaquita live in their natural habitat in Mexico’s northern Gulf of California, and biologists estimate the species will become extinct within three years if no action is taken, according to a press release from the Animal Welfare Institute, which is spearheading the boycott movement along with the Natural Resources Defense Council and the Center for Biological Diversity. “This is the vaquita’s very last chance,” Sarah Uhlemann, international program director with the Center for Biological Diversity, said in a press release. “For decades, Mexican officials have failed the vaquita, and now only the strongest of actions will get their attention. To save these wonderful little porpoises, we have to boycott Mexican shrimp.” READ MORE

OCEANA

Mangroves died of thirst
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AUSTRALIA - A James Cook University scientist has discovered why there was an unprecedented dieback of mangroves in the Gulf of Carpentaria in early 2016 – the plants died of thirst. As explained in findings published today in the Journal of Marine and Freshwater Research, Dr Norman Duke, leader of JCU’s Mangrove Research hub, headed an investigation into the massive mangrove dieback, using aerial observations and satellite mapping data of the area dating back to 1972, combined with weather and climate records. Dr Duke said they found three factors came together to produce the unprecedented dieback of 7400 hectares of mangroves, which stretched for 1000 kilometres along the Gulf coast. “From 2011 the coastline had experienced below-average rainfalls, and the 2015/16 drought was particularly severe. Secondly the temperatures in the area were at record levels and thirdly, some mangroves were left high and dry as the sea level dropped about 20cm during a particularly strong El Nino.” READ MORE

LAST WORD
 
Hello everyone at MAP!


I hope that this email finds you all well and everyone is having an excellent week!

My name is Emma McDowell and I am the new Volunteer Intern at MAP. I am from the United States (Vermont), I am currently completing a US Fulbright Grant in Nakhon Si Tammarat, Thailand. As part of my grant I am encouraged to take time to pursue an internship in a field that is of interest to me, and I am so excited to be working at MAP for the next month.

I double majored in Environmental Studies and Spanish & Hispanic Studies in university, and am looking to apply for masters programs in Anthropology with an emphasis on Environmental Conservation and Management in the coming year. The past two years I have worked in Costa Rica, Guatemala and Thailand on different environmental and wildlife conservation projects and am excited to learn more at MAP.

I am very interested in learning as much as I can about community based conservation projects, mangrove forests, and gaining experience working in the field and the office. I would love to help out in any way that I can, so please to not hesitate to let me know if there is anything I can do to make your jobs easier.

I look forward to working with you all and getting to know everyone!

Sending my best,
Emma McDowell
MAP-Asia Office Development & Field Project Assistant (Volunteer Intern)
Save the mangrove forest in Pitas (Sabah), Eastern Malaysia
Please support this important alert being launched by Forest Peoples Program (FPP) SIGN PETITION
VIEW VIDEO


The world's largest mangrove forest is in danger from a massive coal plant.
UNESCO can put pressure on India and Bangladesh to protect the forest, but they need to see that people around the world are speaking out. Click here to add your voice


MAP Calendar 2017
 This is our 16th annual edition of Children's Mangrove Art, and this Calendar is celebrating MAP's 25th Anniversary! Please order your calendars now, and help us celebrate a quarter century of MAP's work to Save the Mangroves!"


Mangroves: Guidebook to Malaysia – available for download here
 
Mangrove rehabilitation in Asia – Local Action and cross-border Transfer of Knowledge for the Conservation of Climate, Forests and Biodiversity VIEW VIDEOS HERE
 
STOP PLANTING MANGROVES ON SEAGRASS BEDS _ A CALL TO ACTION
Want to learn more about mangroves?mangrove-action-project-presentation-1-1024.jpg?cb=1424228039
Our short presentation will give you a better understanding of the issues we are working to solve. WATCH PRESENTATION
What is CBEMR? Easy to follow fact sheet – CLICK HERE

SHARE MAP'S VISION 
CLICK HERE to watch short introductory video. Together we can work "at the roots of the sea".
Our short documentary, Reducing the Risk of Disaster through Nature-Based Solutions : Mangroves
EPIC-Film 2
 
Exclusive Interview with Alfredo Quarto, Co-Founder and Executive Director of Mangrove Action Project - See more
 
Question Your Shrimp- Don't Buy or Sell Imported Tropical Shrimp! Sign the Petition

Marvellous Mangroves Curriculum
 
Marvellous-Mangroves-Myths-and-Legends-Promo
MAP Education Director Martin Keeley’s most recent book is Marvellous Mangroves: Myths and Legends, a compilation of stories from “Mangrove Peoples”—those who live on shorelines where mangroves thrive—from around the world. READ MORE

Marvellous Mangroves Curriculum in Bangladesh - WATCH VIDEO
MARVELLOUS MANGROVES IN BRAZIL
En Portuges

MAP%20Curriculum%20Video
Marvellous Mangroves – A Curriculum-Based Teachers Guide.


FOR MORE ON MAPs AWARD WINNING CHINA MANGROVE CURRICULUM VISIT
Education in the Mangroves - China
VIMEO SHOW
VISIT OUR "MM" WEBPAGE

Check out our presentation for more details on Marvellous Mangroves

“Education In The Mangroves" can now be seen on the  PhotoPhilanthropy website here!

Read this 10 page history of the development of MAP’s educational curriculum VIEW DOCUMENT
 
Article in Canada's Green Teacher Magazine - Read More

FREE MAP Mangrove e-cards CLICK HERE
Mangrove-Roots-from-Below-Columbia-277x186
MAP’s e-Cards offer you a unique way to spread the word about MAP’s good works, while sharing beautiful photographs of the mangroves

Donate to MAP via Paypal
Giving could never be easier
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It’s the action, not the fruit of the action, that's important. You have to do the right thing. It may not be in your power, may not be in your time, that there'll be any fruit. But that doesn't mean you stop doing the right thing. You may never know what results come from your action. But if you do nothing, there will be no result. —Mahatma Gandhi

Green Planet Fundraising Assists MAP – LEARN MORE

 

 Volunteer Opportunities with Mangrove Action Project CLICK HERE

MANGROVE ISSUES 
View MAP’s uploaded Videos at MAPmangrover’sChannel
Question Your Shrimp Consumer/Markets Campaign!  WATCH VIDEO

Mangrove Restoration in Asia – Watch Short Video

Mosaic of Life 
READ A MOSAIC OF LIFE Peek into the underwater world of mangroves, "womb of the sea." By Liz Cunningham Photos By Wes Matweyew and Liz Cunningham

 

"Question Your Shrimp" Campaign

Learn more about the affects of the shrimp industry on mangroves by visiting our blog
Editor’s Note: Mangrove Action Project’s Executive Director, Alfredo Quarto was interviewed about shrimp by Green Acre Radio’s Martha Baskin
LISTEN TO INTERVIEW

Information sheds clear light on shrimp-mangrove connection
Question Your Shrimp
SEE DETAILS MANGROVE/SHRIMP

Join MAP on Facebook

Sign the Consumer's Pledge to avoid imported shrimp

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Honduras Wetlands Grabbing in Ramsar Site 1000

Written by Jorge Varela Marquez / Goldman Prize recipient (1999)
Translated by Mira Maude Chouinard

Land (and water) grabbing and loss of biodiversity is taking place in the wetlands of Ramsar Site #1000 and the Protected Areas (PAs) of the Gulf of Fonseca, Honduras, mainly due to shrimp aquaculture. The institutions responsible for conserving these ecosystems, such as the Instituto de Conservación Forestal (ICF), the Honduran Forestry Conservation Institute, and Mi Ambiente (MiA), the country’s Energy, Natural Resources, Environment and Mining Ministry, are unable or unwilling to enforce the environmental essence of their statements and those made by the president of Honduras. 

There are 4 business entrepreneurs in the Gulf in Fonseca who are taking over the wetlands along a large portion of the southern coast. The Spanish transnational corporation’s (owned by Mr. Jaime Soriano and managed by countryman Antonio Cano) shrimp farm El Faro, was the first to violate Decree 5-99-e of the Declaration of Protected Areas (PA) in 2000 and destroyed about 100 hectares of the PA and Ramsar Site La Berbería, along with the acquiescence of state officials and the endorsement of the government’s forces. The actual offense was committed with impunity, and now the rest of La Berbería is under threat of destruction. Complaints of Cano’s actions reached the ICF and MiA, but they failed in their duty. The original El Faro Shrimp Farm  colapsed and new farms expanded on tens of hectares in La Berbería; this time with the complicity of some fishermen and the sad silence of the NGO that was once a proprietor of its declaration as a protected area. 

On February 14, 2017, the complaint about this ecocide was formally presented, but the ICF and MiA remained silent. On February 15, the newspaper El Heraldo published the headline: “The European Union can RESTRICT ACCESS TO SHRIMP FOR MANGROVE LOGGING". The article mentions other cases of protected areas being grabbed and converted to shrimp farms. Almost immediately, on February 17, MiA retorts in El Heraldo, “Environment Ministry would fine SHRIMP FARMERS WHO HAVE DESTROYED PROTECTED AREAS”. In this regard, it should be noted that if the fine does not include the recovery and restoration of the intervention area, it can be perceived as mockery and complicity. 

To worsen the situation of the official environmental policy, the digital journal Criterio writes "EUROPEAN PARLIAMENTARY REQUESTS END OF PARTNERSHIP AGREEMENT BETWEEN EUROPEAN UNION AND HONDURAS”. This was presented on the anniversary of the murder of environmentalist Bertha Cáceres and also proposes cutting off bilateral aid to the Honduran state, particularly in the Eurojustice program. 

In response to this threat, it should become a priority to truly protect the environment, to do justice to those who gave their lives in the fight for the conservation of territories and to protect other  environmentalists exposed to the threat of extractive companies. 

Of the 3 Goldman Prize winners in Honduras who were recognized internationally for their environmental struggle, one of them escaped the country, another was killed (Bertha), and only one remains. 

For how long?


Seven women from Venezuela receive awards from Global Environment Facility

Through the mangrove restoration project in Amuay, led by AEPA FALCÓN, the Small Grants Program of the Global Environment Facility Venezuela, has sought to recognize the role of fisherwomen/.
For the first time in Venezuela, seven fisher-women from Paraguaná have been recognized by the Environmental Protection Association (AEPA Falcon), a non governmental environmental organization that is governed by the United Nations.
The event, called Meeting of Fisher Women”, is aimed at enhancing the role of women in fishing, thus breaking with the norms that artisanal fishing in Venezuela. The award recognizes that their production and efforts are no longer solely relegated to men and shows that females are now being seen within this ancestral practice and play a crucial role in society.
The meeting was attended by regional authorities, including the Legislative Council member Falcón (CLEF) Daicis López, Falcón Ombudsman Edisoi Sandoval, Los Taques councilor Ronny Falcón, the chronicler of Los Taques Jesus Muñoz Freites, representatives of the Regional Comptroller, Ministry of Fisheries, Unamujer and delegates of CONPPA Tío Pedro from the community of El Supí.
During the event, the first fisherwoman of Amuay given special recognition was Carmen Benita Sánchez, who on March 8 turns 100 years old, and has established an example of the struggle and work fisherwomen have earned. Also honored were Juana Valbuena (86), Juana Sánchez (86), María Ramona Sánchez (78) and Deisy Frontado (49) who each received well-deserved awards as well.
Engineer Henderson Colina, a general coordinator of AEPA Falcón, said that this recognition aligns with the goals of the group, and its differentiating factor in other communities was the leading role of women in atisinal fishing and the community reflects this participation.
"We are sure that this is only the first meeting to empower the women's experiences with other communities from other latitudes. We are planning a 2018 exchange with institutions in Brazil, where women play an important and even more active role than in Venezuela. In fact, the change in cultural attitudes towards female fishers is in our country, because in other nations women are more organized and accepted for their roles. For example, in Brazil there is the council of artisanal fishers within the Mangrove Network, led by women," Henderson Colina said.

He stressed that this activity is part of n ambitious project. "The Mangrove ecosystem source of food sovereignty for the community of Amuay, (chosen by the Small Grants Program of the United Nations system in 2015) its first phase was based on the restoration of the mangrove, and recovery of the water system for its regeneration. This recognition, in the framework of achieving sustainable livelihoods is in line with the United Nations Global Agenda for 2015-2030, which includes 17 sustainable development goals."

Thursday, March 2, 2017

MAP News Issue 411, March 4, 2017

Mangrove Action Project

The MAP News
411th Edition                               March 4, 2017

FEATURE STORY
Mangroves: the secret weapon in the carbon battle
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USA - We may have had the solution to carbon sequestration under our noses all along – but have we recognised it too late? Mangrove forests cover only a small percentage of the planet in comparison to other forest types – roughly 1.9% of coastline in the world – but they contain the largest source of carbon sequestration per hectare of land and are a major player in the carbon cycle of the oceans. This means they have high economic value as “blue carbon” – carbon captured in oceans and coastal ecosystems – but around the world they have often been destroyed in the course of coastal development, agricultural and mining activities. Increasingly, however, they are being acknowledged as formidable carbon sinks. But has this acknowledgement come too late? Does the ongoing loss mean we’ve squandered our best last chance to put the brake on global warming? Carbon is stored as biomass in the sediment captured through the growth of mangroves. The carbon produced by its decomposing roots alone is a major contributor to this complex sink. The removal of mangroves adds 10% to the total carbon lost from global tropical deforestation through greenhouse gas emissions. READ MORE

AFRICA

Mangrove Conservation for Improved Climate Resilience in the Limpopo River Basin
NongMo
MOZAMBIQUE - Mangrove ecosystems are under threat globally, disappearing at an annual rate of 1%. At this rate, mangroves could be extinct within the next 100 years. In the Limpopo River Estuary, where the only mangroves in the basin are found, the livelihoods of many rural people depend on the ecosystem goods and services mangroves provide. With climate change expecting to increase the frequency and intensity of extreme weather events, the rehabilitation and conservation of mangrove vegetation is more needed than ever. The USAID Southern Africa Resilience in the Limpopo River Basin (RESILIM) program partnered with the Centre for the Sustainable Use of Coastal Zones in Mozambique to work with the local communities in Xai-Xai, to replant and rehabilitate mangrove vegetation in the river estuary and raise awareness about the importance and the need for mangrove ecosystem conservation. This video explains the methodology used and shows how it is done for replication anywhere in the world. VIEW VIDEO

Red Sea mangroves fight back in the face of global decline
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Our research shows that there has been no decline in mangrove stands in the Red Sea – the body of water that runs between Africa and the Arabian peninsula. Red Sea mangrove coverage has actually increased by 12% since 1972. We used remote sensing to analyse satellite images and map the temporal and spatial prevalence of mangroves around the coasts of the Red Sea over the past four decades. The Red Sea is one of the world’s saltiest and warmest seas. It is an extremely harsh environment, surrounded by desert and subject to very high temperatures. No rivers empty into the sea, which, along with the warm conditions, give it its high salt content. The mangroves found along the Red Sea coasts are some of the northernmost in the world. The extreme conditions mean that the mangroves of the Red Sea have been subjected to much lower levels of human activity than elsewhere. READ MORE

ASIA

Global Mangrove Alliance rallies the world to reverse loss of world’s most valuable coastal ecosystems
INDONESIA - At the World Ocean Summit in Bali, Indonesia The Global Mangrove Alliance announced an initiative to increase mangrove habitats 20 percent by 2030. Conservation International, The Nature Conservancy and World Wildlife Fund will work together to build a global alliance and leverage the expertise, funding, knowledge, resources, diverse skills and networks of all members to amplify existing efforts and increase attention to the critical role of mangroves in coastal ecosystems. The Alliance is developing a work plan based on consultations with experts on the ground around the world. Projects will be expanded locally, regionally and globally with communities, governments and private sector leaders committed to halting and reversing mangrove forest loss, which already amounts to 50 percent of the world’s habitats over the past half century. “People who live in and around mangroves benefit from their services but it’s important that people around the world realize the impact that mangrove habitats have on our planet,” said Maria Damanaki, Global Managing Director, Oceans at The Nature Conservancy. “The loss of these ecosystems could cause devastating effects to wildlife and humans alike and we need to start taking greater action now.” READ MORE

AMERICAS

Young mangrove defenders fight to save Panama's wetlands
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PANAMA - Panama's mangroves play a key role in fighting global warming. They absorb and store billions of tons of CO2 and protect against coastal erosion and storm surges. But they are under threat. Since the 1970s, Panama has lost 55 percent of its mangrove forests. Thousands of hectares have been cut down to make way for apartment blocks and grazing pastures. And so-called "cascareros" - people who specialize in debarking red mangroves for the tanning industry - have also destroyed millions of trees. But, with international help, Panama is turning the tide. Its environment ministry is designing new conservation rules and working with local inhabitants to preserve the mangroves. One part of the project involves a group of school children who call themselves young mangrove defenders. VIEW VIDEO

Reports of Mangrove Damage in Yucatan
MEXICO - There are more than 300 closures and 100 complaints to the Attorney General's Office (PGR) in Yucatan for the invasion and destruction of mangroves in the jungle of Progreso. The problem is that that authority does not give them due course, said Jose Lafontaine Hamui, delegate of Profepa in the complaint. The problem of swamp invasion by families that destroy the mangroves to fill the site with make-shift cardboard and wood houses is serious, he said. The official warned that in addition, they must understand that they are installed in a high-risk area, as they not only affect and invade a federal area, but also put themselves in danger with their fragile homes. He also noted that agencies have worked to prevent the action and have done everything in their power, but the other instances to which they have to act they do not. The invaders violate the law, commit federal crimes, even more are destroying the mangroves. All that is missing is that the Attorney General's Office take action and do his part, he said. LEA MAS EN ESPANOL

EQUATOR PRIZE 2017 CALL FOR NOMINATIONS
Equator Prize
The Equator Prize 2017 will be awarded to outstanding community and indigenous initiatives that are advancing nature-based solutions for local sustainable development. Each winning group will receive USD 10,000 and will be invited to participate in a series of policy dialogues and special events during the United Nations General Assembly in New York in September 2017. In celebration of its 15th anniversary, the Equator Initiative will also launch a web portal of local nature-based solutions to sustainable development. The platform will serve to connect communities around the world and share local solutions that work. Participation in this platform is optional when submitting nominations for the Equator Prize. Nominations may be submitted in Arabic, Chinese, English, French, Indonesian, Portuguese, Russian, or Spanish. Nominations must be submitted by 8 March 2017.
For full eligibility requirements and selection criteria, please click here.
To access the online nomination system, please visit prize.equatorinitiative.org


EUROPE

Mass mangrove restoration: Driven by good intentions but offering limited results
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SWITZERLAND - In recent years, hundreds and sometimes thousands of volunteers have been involved in mass mangrove planting efforts, gaining media recognition and even earning entries into the Guinness Book of World Records. This has drawn attention to the urgent need to address the global degradation of coastal ecosystems. But are these planting initiatives sustainable? Do they have the desired impact? In short, do they work? Coastal communities are first to face the impacts of coastal degradation – reduced flood protection, decreased water quality, extreme soil erosion and a rapid decline in the variety and abundance of food sources (many of which come from mangroves in the tropics). Mass mangrove plantings should help address these challenges in certain areas, but instead many restoration efforts worldwide (for example, in the Philippines) are failing. There are several issues. Restoring a mangrove is a complex process that needs to be founded on the principles of ecosystem management. Often, fast-paced and large-scale ‘restoration events’ are not necessarily scientifically robust in terms of which mangrove species should be restored, and where. READ MORE

OCEANA

Scientists to test 50 coral reefs to seek ways to counter climate change
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AUSTRALIA - Ocean scientists will pick 50 coral reefs worldwide to test ways to limit damage from climate change, pollution and over-fishing that threatens to wipe out 90 percent of all reefs by 2050, according to a plan launched on Thursday. Last year was the warmest on record the third time in a row, damaging corals from Australia's Great Barrier Reef to the Caribbean, a loss for fragile species and a threat to coastal economies in the magnitude of billions of dollars. An alliance of scientists, conservationists and philanthropists said experts will select 50 reefs around the globe during 2017 and then test conservation techniques that will be extended elsewhere if successful. "There's been a lot of work on identifying the train crash (for corals) but very little about 'let's not let this happen'," said Ove Hoegh-Guldberg, director of the Global Change Institute at the University of Queensland and a leader of the "50 Reefs" project. READ MORE

LAST WORD
 
Mr. José Antonio Galdames
Secretary of Energy, Environment and Natural Resources Mines. (My Environment)
joseantoniogaldames@gmail.com

Ing. Misael León
Executive Director
Forest Conservation Institute Protected Areas and Wildlife. (ICF)
icfdireccion@gmail.com

cc: Juan Orlando Hernández Alvarado
President of the Republic of Honduras


Dear Sirs,

I believe that you are the correct officials responsible for the conservation of your nation’s mangrove ecosystems, which are facing some very real threats from development. I am the co-founder and director of Mangrove Action Project (MAP), which is a global network seeking to conserve and restore mangrove wetlands worldwide. We at MAP are quite concerned that even today illicit development of new shrimp farms is causing wide-scale losses of even “protected” mangrove forests in Honduras. Such further loss to the mangroves anywhere is of worldwide concern to all of our network, namely because mangroves play such an important role in combating climate change, supporting will fisheries, protecting coastal communities from natural disasters such as hurricanes and tsunamis, and preventing coastal erosion from sea level rise.

We all need the mangroves, and for these reasons and more, we need to enforce the laws and punish the perpetrators who are illegally clearing mangroves for private gains. Mere payment of a small fine by those who have destroyed such protected areas will never be enough. We at MAP urge you to halt further such losses and help us work to restore the mangroves that have been affected by shrimp farm expansion or roadway building. This is especially relevant in the case of the Protected Areas of the Gulf of Fonseca and Ramsar Site # 1000.

For the Mangroves and the Mangrove Communities!

Alfredo Quarto,
Co-Director
Mangrove Action Project
alfredo@mangroveactionproject.org
 
We'd love to hear from you! Write us your stories or respond to ours and we'll select one to feature here, giving you "The Last Word"!




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Action Alerts:

EQUATOR PRIZE 2017 CALL FOR NOMINATIONS
Nominations must be submitted by 8 March 2017. For full eligibility requirements and selection criteria, please click here.

Save the mangrove forest in Pitas (Sabah), Eastern Malaysia
Please support this important alert being launched by forest peoples programme (FPP) SIGN PETITION
VIEW VIDEO


The world's largest mangrove forest is in danger from a massive coal plant.
UNESCO can put pressure on India and Bangladesh to protect the forest, but they need to see that people around the world are speaking out. Click here to add your voice


MAP Calendar 2017
 This is our 16th annual edition of Children's Mangrove Art, and this Calendar is celebrating MAP's 25th Anniversary! Please order your calendars now, and help us celebrate a quarter century of MAP's work to Save the Mangroves!"


Mangroves: Guidebook to Malaysia – available for download here
 
Mangrove rehabilitation in Asia – Local Action and cross-border Transfer of Knowledge for the Conservation of Climate, Forests and Biodiversity VIEW VIDEOS HERE
 
STOP PLANTING MANGROVES ON SEAGRASS BEDS _ A CALL TO ACTION
Want to learn more about mangroves?mangrove-action-project-presentation-1-1024.jpg?cb=1424228039
Our short presentation will give you a better understanding of the issues we are working to solve. WATCH PRESENTATION
What is CBEMR? Easy to follow fact sheet – CLICK HERE

SHARE MAP'S VISION 
CLICK HERE to watch short introductory video. Together we can work "at the roots of the sea".
Our short documentary, Reducing the Risk of Disaster through Nature-Based Solutions : Mangroves
EPIC-Film 2
 
Exclusive Interview with Alfredo Quarto, Co-Founder and Executive Director of Mangrove Action Project - See more
 
Question Your Shrimp- Don't Buy or Sell Imported Tropical Shrimp! Sign the Petition

Marvellous Mangroves Curriculum
 
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MAP Education Director Martin Keeley’s most recent book is Marvellous Mangroves: Myths and Legends, a compilation of stories from “Mangrove Peoples”—those who live on shorelines where mangroves thrive—from around the world. READ MORE

Marvellous Mangroves Curriculum in Bangladesh - WATCH VIDEO
MARVELLOUS MANGROVES IN BRAZIL
En Portuges

MAP%20Curriculum%20Video
Marvellous Mangroves – A Curriculum-Based Teachers Guide.


FOR MORE ON MAPs AWARD WINNING CHINA MANGROVE CURRICULUM VISIT
Education in the Mangroves - China
VIMEO SHOW
VISIT OUR "MM" WEBPAGE

Check out our presentation for more details on Marvellous Mangroves

“Education In The Mangroves" can now be seen on the  PhotoPhilanthropy website here!

Read this 10 page history of the development of MAP’s educational curriculum VIEW DOCUMENT
 
Article in Canada's Green Teacher Magazine - Read More

FREE MAP Mangrove e-cards CLICK HERE
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MAP’s e-Cards offer you a unique way to spread the word about MAP’s good works, while sharing beautiful photographs of the mangroves

Donate to MAP via Paypal
Giving could never be easier
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It’s the action, not the fruit of the action, that's important. You have to do the right thing. It may not be in your power, may not be in your time, that there'll be any fruit. But that doesn't mean you stop doing the right thing. You may never know what results come from your action. But if you do nothing, there will be no result. —Mahatma Gandhi

Green Planet Fundraising Assists MAP – LEARN MORE

 

 Volunteer Opportunities with Mangrove Action Project CLICK HERE

MANGROVE ISSUES 
View MAP’s uploaded Videos at MAPmangrover’sChannel
Question Your Shrimp Consumer/Markets Campaign!  WATCH VIDEO

Mangrove Restoration in Asia – Watch Short Video

Mosaic of Life 
READ A MOSAIC OF LIFE Peek into the underwater world of mangroves, "womb of the sea." By Liz Cunningham Photos By Wes Matweyew and Liz Cunningham

 

"Question Your Shrimp" Campaign

Learn more about the affects of the shrimp industry on mangroves by visiting our blog
Editor’s Note: Mangrove Action Project’s Executive Director, Alfredo Quarto was interviewed about shrimp by Green Acre Radio’s Martha Baskin
LISTEN TO INTERVIEW

Information sheds clear light on shrimp-mangrove connection
Question Your Shrimp
SEE DETAILS MANGROVE/SHRIMP

Join MAP on Facebook

Sign the Consumer's Pledge to avoid imported shrimp

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